WebQuest

Charting the Course: Social Studies WebQuest

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Part 1 - American History - Westward Expansion


Grade 5 Standards:

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Concept 5: Westward Expansion, PO 5: "Describe the following individuals' role in the reform movement before the Civil War: a. Frederick Douglass, b. Harriet Tubman, c. William Lloyd Garrison, d. Sojourner Truth" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.8). 

Arizona Department of Education, Reading Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 1: Reading Process, Concept 4: Vocabulary, PO 5: "Determine the meanings, pronunciation, syllabication, synonyms, antonyms, and parts of speech of words, by using a variety of reference aids [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2003, p.1). 

Arizona Department of Education, Reading Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Comprehending Informational Text, Concept 2: Functional Text, PO 1: "Locate specific information from functional text [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2003, p.4). 

Purpose:
Students will learn about important reformers of the antebellum reform movement, and how they affected  reform components such as abolitionism and suffrage. In addition, students are to learn that demonstrating against inequality may cause change, and should thus exchange their feelings with other members of society to make the latter fair and equal for all. 

Rationale:
The activities of this part of the WebQuest make students aware of historical events by means of meaningful activities and multi-sensory materials. By means of web-resources, such as YouTube videos and online documents, students learn how to gather information on historical events. The use of an online dictionary furthermore teaches students how to use the web to answer questions and how fast the web delivers a definition for a vocabulary word. In addition, the creation of the word game for self-assessment includes the highest levels of Bloom's Taxonomy - creation of new products and evaluation of previously learned material. Students teach one another about reformers in a historical period and provide the material needed for self-assessment (the cards for the reform movement game). In addition, students do not only learn about historical facts, they furthermore engage in Language Arts. By teaching students about how to use bullet points - a popular summarizing technique - students are able to organize their information in clear and meaningful ways, which aids their presentation skills. A diversity of students is addressed by means of collaborative learning activities.

Values and Knowledge:
Students will learn about the reform movement before the civil war, as well as how it was brought about by certain reformers. Students will furthermore learn how historical events have brought about change in society. In addition, students will learn the value of  equality and demonstration against inequality. This will teach students that they can personally bring about change if they exchange information with other society members and express their views. These values are crucial components of being a good and just citizen. 

Implementation Process:
Throughout this part of the WebQuest, the teacher provides students with the basic knowledge they need to possess in order to acquire information on their respective topic. The teacher presents students with the material, the knowledge about bullet points, and the Word sample document for the card game, so that students can work independently, accummulating information on their respective topic. Throughout the research process, the teacher acts as a facilitator, challenging the students by providing them with questions that aid them in researching their topic. The lesson shifts gradually, and becomes more student-centered as time proceeds, ending with a self-assessment game which aids the students in seeing whether they have understood the topic and acquired the information necessary. At the same time, the teacher can see whether students need more input on the topic or whether they have mastered the concepts effectively.  


Part 2 - World History - Age of Revolution

Grade 5 Standards: 

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 2: World History, Concept 6: Age of Revolution, PO 4: "Compare the outcomes of the American Revolution to those of other countries (e.g. France, Haiti, Mexico, South America, Russia)" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.4).

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 2: World History, Concept 1: Research Skills for History, PO 2: "Construct timelines of the historical era being studied [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.1). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 2: Expository, PO1: "Record information [...] related to topic" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.7). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 2: Expository, PO2: "Write an expository paragraph that contains a. a topic sentence, b. supporting details, c. relevant information" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.7). 

Purpose:
Students will learn about the American and French revolution and will be able to identify the most important events. Students will also learn additional historical vocabulary words that will be added to a revolution dictionary which they can refer to for the rest of this unit. Students will furthermore learn about the outcomes of each revolution, and will present these outcomes in a speech of the head of state. Furthermore, students will compare the outcomes of the revolutions in a paragraph which they will accompany with a Venn diagram to express their ideas. Students therefore learn how revolutions inform a change of government and influence other countries. 

Rationale:
The activities of this part of the WebQuest present students with knowledge as well as inquiry skills. Students are guided by means of questions and certain sources in their research. Meaningful activities, such as creating a vocabulary dictionary and creating a speech by the head of state help students to understand historical vocabulary as well as the concept of revolution. Since students work together in collaborative groups, they will be able to support one another and be highly motivated to learn due to an informal atmosphere. Furthermore, students work towards a goal by means of using inquiry skills, namely those of naming causes and effects. Students first research the main events of the revolution and then research the effects it had on the country, which they present in their speeches.  In addition, students are involved into assessment of their timelines, which provides them with ownership and shows them immediate mistakes. Including work into students' portfolios furthermore serves as an incentive to work hard and presents students with the opportunity to meet the teacher's expectations since the rubric is distributed to them. Overall, students are thus highly motivated to work, know the teacher's expectations, and are involved into meaningful activities at all times. 

Values and Knowledge:
Students will expand their knowledge on the American Revolution and the French Revolution by researching the web and completing meaningful activities. Students will furthermore understand that revolutions have an important impact on the government and people, which can transfer to other countries. Students will be taught the values of democracy and equality throughout their research process, and will understand that historical events have impacted present-day countries and government. 

Implementation Process: 
Throughout this part of the WebQuest, the teacher refreshes students' knowledge on the American Revolution and introduces the French Revolution to students by providing them with research material. Students are to independently complete the research by using the sources presented in the Task Tab and answering the respective research questions. The teacher furthermore presents students with assessment rubrics before they complete a task so that students are aware of the teacher's expectations. Throughout the lesson, the teacher acts as a facilitator, helping the students with their research questions and providing them with clues if necessary. The teacher acts as the audience when students present their speeches and is thus a participant in the learning process while students assume the role of teachers. 

Part 3 - Civics/Government - Structure of Government

Grade 5 Standards:

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Civics/Government, Concept 2: Structure of Government, PO 2: "Describe how the Constitution is designed to limit central government, as in freedom from a controlling monarchy" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.2). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 3:Functional, PO 1: "Write a variety of functional text [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.8).

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 3: Functional, PO 2: "Write communications, including [...] c. formal letters [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.8). 

Purpose:
Students will learn what democracy and monarchy are and how they are different. In addition, students will learn that the U.S. Constitution contains democratic features. Students will furthermore learn how to construct their own laws in a democratic manner with appropriate government restrictions. Furthermore, students will learn important vocabulary related to the topic and will engage in writing their own constitution in form of a letter, as a review of functional writing, which has previously been practiced in English class. Students will therefore come to realize that the U.S. Constitution contains democratic features and that the law-making process is one of great responsibility. 

Rationale:
The activities of this WebQuest do not only lead to increase students' knowledge but furthermore increase students' inquiry skills. Students are presented with a historical situation and are asked to design their own constitution, which encourages students to engage into a decision-making process. Students do not only research monarchy and democracy with the web, they furthermore design their personal constitution on parchment paper based on the outcomes of their research. Since students are to dress up and present their presentations, they are provided with a real-life experience of being a founding father, and can relate to the historical event much better. The fact that the documents will be scanned provides students with ownership and incentive. The incorporation of students' personal thoughts as well as web-based multi-sensory resources such as movies and written documents proves as an encouragement to learn and connects students with a historical topic. In addition, students are engaged into assessment, assessing their peers' presentations of the constitution for democratic features, creativity, and other factors. The involvement into assessment enables students to meet the teacher's expectations and makes them more critical, self-reliant learners.  

Values and Knowledge: 
Students will learn that the constitution contains democratic features. Furthermore, students will become aware of the contrast that exists between monarchy and democracy, as well as the responsibility that lies in designing laws or amendments to the constitution. Throughout this part of the WebQuest, students will learn the values of democracy and responsibility. 

Implementation Process:
Throughout this part of the WebQuest, the teacher takes a step back and acts as an observer and facilitator. Students are in focus and complete their work by educating themselves about monarchy and democracy. The teacher merely serves as a writer of their thoughts when students collect their findings about democracy and monarchy. In the second part of the lesson, students again are asked to be creative and design their personal laws. The teacher may help students by recommending research on the web or re-reading elements of the previously created chart on the SmartBoard on democracy and monarchy. Students then teach one another about their personally written and chosen laws throughout the presentations at the end. The teacher asks challenging questions to ensure that students can explain why they have created their laws and serves as the mediator between the presenters and other, evaluating peers. 

Part 4 - Geography - Places and Regions

Grade 5 Standards:

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 4: Geography, Concept 2: Places and Regions, PO 2: "Describe the geographic characteristics of a state in the United States with the assistance of maps, the internet, atlases, and other reference materials" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.2). 

Arizona Department of Education, Reading Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 1: Reading Process, Concept 6: Comprehension, PO 6: "Use reading strategies ([...] making inferences [...]) to comprehend text" (Arizona Department of Education, 2003, p.2). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 6: Research, PO 1: "Paraphrase information from a variety of sources [...]" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.9). 

Purpose:
Students will learn about the geographical characteristics of their state, the State of Arizona. Students do not only create their personal questions on the geographical characteristics, but furthermore find the answers throughout their web research. In addition, students are presented with crucial vocabulary words that aid them in their research. Students furthermore revise how to paraphrase information from websites and other sources. The information that has been accumulated is furthermore presented in a clay model so that students can express their information in a different, hands-on activity. 

Rationale:
The tasks of this part of the WebQuest engage students into hands-on activities while teaching them content knowledge, language arts, and inquiry skills at the same time. Students are involved into a real-life situation of hosting a guest from a foreign country, and learn how to accumulate information on their state of residence. Furthermore, students practice questioning and problem-solving skills by solving the request posed in the letter. Students furthermore learn how to present information in multi-sensory ways, namely by means of a clay model, which provides them with ownership. Due to the variety of sources and resources as well as activities, all learning styles are addressed and students are engaged into meaningful tasks. Due to collaborative grouping, students can help one another throughout the research process and learn social skills at the same time. Therefore, ELL students and other diversities are addressed. Students are furthermore made aware of the requirements and expectations by means of a checklist and rubric. While the checklist serves for self-assessment and lets students reflect on their work, the rubric serves as an outline of the teacher's expectations and gives students an idea of how to complete the travel booklet. 

Values and Knowledge: 
Students learn how to research on the internet and paraphrase the information found. Furthermore, they learn about the unique properties of their state of residence and practice how to find answers to self-created questions, which increases students' problem-solving skills. In addition, students learn to value nature through valuing their direct natural environment as it is, with all its properties and unique features. 

Implementation Process:
Throughout this part of the WebQuest, the teacher acts as a mediator of knowledge to provide students with the basics. The teacher applies scaffolding throughout the vocabulary and paraphrasing activity, shifting the responsibility to the students, who use the newly learned information to conduct research and create a product. The teacher has a passive role throughout the presentations and modeling activities, throughout which he circulates and provides help if necessary but encourages students' independence and self-reliance. Throughout the presentations, the teacher assumes the role of a learner who wants to know about the physical features of Arizona, and thus gives students the opportunity to assume the role of the teacher. 

Part 5 - Economics - Personal Finance

Grade 5 Standards:

Arizona Department of Education, Social Studies Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 5: Economics, Concept 5: Personal Finance, PO 1: "Explain how the following are used to purchase goods and services: a. cash, b. check, c. money order, d. debit card, e. credit card" (Arizona Department of Education, 2006, p.4). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 2: Expository, PO 2: "Write an expository paragraph that contains: a. a topic sentence, b. supporting details, c. relevant information" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.7). 

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 3: Writing Applications, Concept 2: Expository, PO 3: "Write in a variety of expository forms ([...] journal)" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.7).

Arizona Department of Education, Writing Standard Articulated by Grade Level - Fifth Grade, Strand 1: Writing Process, Concept 1: Prewriting, PO 1: "Generate ideas through a variety of activities ([...] brainstorming, graphic organizers [...])" (Arizona Department of Education, 2004, p.1). 

Purpose:
This part of the WebQuest teaches students how to use different types of payment and what the advantages and disadvantages are. Students therefore critically examine each type of payment and take their personal situation into account. In addition, students are taught useful vocabulary words to understand the topic of personal finance. Students furthermore revise the concepts of how to write a journal, an expository writing assignment. 

Rationale:
This part of the WebQuest involves many different types of the Social Studies instructional process. Students learn much more than just how to use each type of payment. Students are familiarized with the advantages and disadvantages of each type by being introduced to a problem in a real-life situation. Students therefore tend to be more interested and motivated to learn. By means of creating a profile of each type of payment, students are provided with an overview and can make their decision individually. Students furthermore learn how to support their decision, namely by naming advantages of their chosen type of payment and of their choice to buy or not to buy the I-Pad. Students thus practice their decision making and problem solving skills at the same time. Furthermore, language arts are included into instruction by means of having students write a journal and learn vocabulary words related to the topic. Vocabulary words furthermore help a diversity of students, especially ELLs, to learn content knowledge in a structured way and aim at connecting prior knowledge to the topic. By means of reconsidering their decision after a discussion with the whole class, students are actively involved into evaluation which provides them with self-reliance and responsibility. Overall, this part of the WebQuest thus aims to increase students' economic skills and make them more responsible citizens. 

Values and Knowledge: 
This part of the WebQuest teaches students decision making and problem solving skills, while informing them about each method of payment. Students will learn how and when to use each method, and what the respective advantages and disadvantages are. Students will furthermore be taught the value of economy and personal freedom of choice. Students will also learn economic responsibility by considering possible negative consequences of their economic decisions.

Implementation Process:
In this part of the WebQuest, the teacher acts as a mediator between the information and the student. The teacher provides students with words that are necessary to know as well as possible sources students can use to accumulate important information. The rest of the work is on the students. They are the ones who make the decisions and should be critically supported by the teacher. Since students evaluate themselves, they are involved into the teaching process as well and can become more responsible learners. 

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http://zunal.com/webquest.php?w=84508
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